Publications

20 Publications visible to you, out of a total of 20

Abstract (Expand)

OBJECTIVE: The rs641738C>T variant located near the membrane-bound O-acyltransferase domain containing 7 (MBOAT7) locus is associated with fibrosis in liver diseases, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), alcohol-related liver disease, hepatitis B and C. We aim to understand the mechanism by which the rs641738C>T variant contributes to pathogenesis of NAFLD. DESIGN: Mice with hepatocyte-specific deletion of MBOAT7 (Mboat7(Deltahep)) were generated and livers were characterised by histology, flow cytometry, qPCR, RNA sequencing and lipidomics. We analysed the association of rs641738C>T genotype with liver inflammation and fibrosis in 846 NAFLD patients and obtained genotype-specific liver lipidomes from 280 human biopsies. RESULTS: Allelic imbalance analysis of heterozygous human liver samples pointed to lower expression of the MBOAT7 transcript on the rs641738C>T haplotype. Mboat7(Deltahep) mice showed spontaneous steatosis characterised by increased hepatic cholesterol ester content after 10 weeks. After 6 weeks on a high fat, methionine-low, choline-deficient diet, mice developed increased hepatic fibrosis as measured by picrosirius staining (p<0.05), hydroxyproline content (p<0.05) and transcriptomics, while the inflammatory cell populations and inflammatory mediators were minimally affected. In a human biopsied NAFLD cohort, MBOAT7 rs641738C>T was associated with fibrosis (p=0.004) independent of the presence of histological inflammation. Liver lipidomes of Mboat7(Deltahep) mice and human rs641738TT carriers with fibrosis showed increased total lysophosphatidylinositol levels. The altered lysophosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylinositol subspecies in MBOAT7(Deltahep) livers and human rs641738TT carriers were similar. CONCLUSION: Mboat7 deficiency in mice and human points to an inflammation-independent pathway of liver fibrosis that may be mediated by lipid signalling and a potentially targetable treatment option in NAFLD.

Authors: V. R. Thangapandi, O. Knittelfelder, M. Brosch, E. Patsenker, O. Vvedenskaya, S. Buch, S. Hinz, A. Hendricks, M. Nati, A. Herrmann, D. R. Rekhade, T. Berg, M. Matz-Soja, K. Huse, E. Klipp, J. K. Pauling, J. A. Wodke, J. Miranda Ackerman, M. V. Bonin, E. Aigner, C. Datz, W. von Schonfels, S. Nehring, S. Zeissig, C. Rocken, A. Dahl, T. Chavakis, F. Stickel, A. Shevchenko, C. Schafmayer, J. Hampe, P. Subramanian

Date Published: 26th Jun 2020

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract (Expand)

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Little is known about genetic factors that affect development of alcohol-related cirrhosis. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of samples from the United Kingdom Biobank (UKB) to identify polymorphisms associated with risk of alcohol-related liver disease. METHODS: We performed a GWAS of 35,839 participants in the UKB with high intake of alcohol against markers of hepatic fibrosis (FIB-4, APRI, and Forns index scores) and hepatocellular injury (levels of aminotransferases). Loci identified in the discovery analysis were tested for their association with alcohol-related cirrhosis in 3 separate European cohorts (phase 1 validation cohort; n=2545). Variants associated with alcohol-related cirrhosis in the validation at a false discovery rate of less than 20% were then directly genotyped in 2 additional European validation cohorts (phase 2 validation, n=2068). RESULTS: In the GWAS of the discovery cohort, we identified 50 independent risk loci with genome-wide significance (P < 5 x 10(-8)). Nine of these loci were significantly associated with alcohol-related cirrhosis in the phase 1 validation cohort; 6 of these 9 loci were significantly associated with alcohol-related cirrhosis in phase 2 validation cohort, at a false discovery rate below 5%. The loci included variants in the mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component 1 gene (MARC1) and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U like 1 gene (HNRNPUL1). After we adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, and type-2 diabetes in the phase 2 validation cohort, the minor A allele of MARC1:rs2642438 was associated with reduced risk of alcohol-related cirrhosis (adjusted odds ratio, 0.76; P=.0027); conversely, the minor C allele of HNRNPUL1:rs15052 was associated with an increased risk of alcohol-related cirrhosis (adjusted odds ratio, 1.30; P=.020). CONCLUSIONS: In a GWAS of samples from the UKB, we identified and validated (in 5 European cohorts) single-nucleotide polymorphisms that affect risk of alcohol-related cirrhosis in opposite directions: the minor A allele in MARC1:rs2642438 decreases risk, whereas the minor C allele in HNRNPUL1:rs15052 increases risk.

Authors: H. Innes, S. Buch, S. Hutchinson, I. N. Guha, J. R. Morling, E. Barnes, W. Irving, E. Forrest, V. Pedergnan, D. Goldberg, E. Aspinall, S. Barclay, P. Hayes, J. Dillon, H. D. Nischalke, P. Lutz, U. Spengler, J. Fischer, T. Berg, M. Brosch, F. Eyer, C. Datz, S. Mueller, T. Peccerella, P. Deltenre, A. Marot, M. Soyka, A. McQuillin, M. Y. Morgan, J. Hampe, F. Stickel

Date Published: 16th Jun 2020

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract (Expand)

Early disease diagnosis is key to the effective treatment of diseases. Histopathological analysis of human biopsies is the gold standard to diagnose tissue alterations. However, this approach has low resolution and overlooks 3D (three-dimensional) structural changes resulting from functional alterations. Here, we applied multiphoton imaging, 3D digital reconstructions and computational simulations to generate spatially resolved geometrical and functional models of human liver tissue at different stages of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We identified a set of morphometric cellular and tissue parameters correlated with disease progression, and discover profound topological defects in the 3D bile canalicular (BC) network. Personalized biliary fluid dynamic simulations predicted an increased pericentral biliary pressure and micro-cholestasis, consistent with elevated cholestatic biomarkers in patients' sera. Our spatially resolved models of human liver tissue can contribute to high-definition medicine by identifying quantitative multiparametric cellular and tissue signatures to define disease progression and provide new insights into NAFLD pathophysiology.

Authors: F. Segovia-Miranda, H. Morales-Navarrete, M. Kucken, V. Moser, S. Seifert, U. Repnik, F. Rost, M. Brosch, A. Hendricks, S. Hinz, C. Rocken, D. Lutjohann, Y. Kalaidzidis, C. Schafmayer, L. Brusch, J. Hampe, M. Zerial

Date Published: 2nd Dec 2019

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract (Expand)

The Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt/β-Catenin (Wnt) cascades are morphogen pathways whose pronounced influence on adult liver metabolism has been identified in recent years. How both pathways communicate and control liver metabolic functions are largely unknown. Detecting core components of Wnt and Hh signaling and mathematical modeling showed that both pathways in healthy liver act largely complementary to each other in the pericentral (Wnt) and the periportal zone (Hh) and communicate mainly by mutual repression. The Wnt/Hh module inversely controls the spatiotemporal operation of various liver metabolic pathways, as revealed by transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome analyses. Shifting the balance to Wnt (activation) or Hh (inhibition) causes pericentralization and periportalization of liver functions, respectively. Thus, homeostasis of the Wnt/Hh module is essential for maintaining proper liver metabolism and to avoid the development of certain metabolic diseases. With caution due to minor species-specific differences, these conclusions may hold for human liver as well.

Authors: Erik Kolbe, Susanne Aleithe, Christiane Rennert, Luise Spormann, Fritzi Ott, David Meierhofer, Robert Gajowski, Claus Stöpel, Stefan Hoehme, Michael Kücken, Lutz Brusch, Michael Seifert, Witigo von Schoenfels, Clemens Schafmayer, Mario Brosch, Ute Hofmann, Georg Damm, Daniel Seehofer, Jochen Hampe, Rolf Gebhardt, Madlen Matz-Soja

Date Published: 1st Dec 2019

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract

Not specified

Authors: Mario Brosch, Kathrin Kattler, Alexander Herrmann, Witigo von Schönfels, Karl Nordström, Daniel Seehofer, Georg Damm, Thomas Becker, Sebastian Zeissig, Sophie Nehring, Fabian Reichel, Vincent Moser, Raghavan Veera Thangapandi, Felix Stickel, Gustavo Baretton, Christoph Röcken, Michael Muders, Madlen Matz-Soja, Michael Krawczak, Gilles Gasparoni, Hella Hartmann, Andreas Dahl, Clemens Schafmayer, Jörn Walter, Jochen Hampe

Date Published: 1st Dec 2018

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract (Expand)

A deeper epigenomic understanding of spatial organization of cells in human tissues is an important challenge. Here we report the first combined positional analysis of transcriptomes and methylomes across three micro-dissected zones (pericentral, intermediate and periportal) of human liver. We identify pronounced anti-correlated transcriptional and methylation gradients including a core of 271 genes controlling zonated metabolic and morphogen networks and observe a prominent porto-central gradient of DNA methylation at binding sites of 46 transcription factors. The gradient includes an epigenetic and transcriptional Wnt signature supporting the concept of a pericentral hepatocyte regeneration pathway under steady-state conditions. While donors with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease show consistent gene expression differences corresponding to the severity of the disease across all zones, the relative zonated gene expression and DNA methylation patterns remain unchanged. Overall our data provide a wealth of new positional insights into zonal networks controlled by epigenetic and transcriptional gradients in human liver.

Authors: Mario Brosch, Kathrin Kattler, Alexander Herrmann, Witigo von Schönfels, Karl Nordström, Daniel Seehofer, Georg Damm, Thomas Becker, Sebastian Zeissig, Sophie Nehring, Fabian Reichel, Vincent Moser, Raghavan Veera Thangapandi, Felix Stickel, Gustavo Baretton, Christoph Röcken, Michael Muders, Madlen Matz-Soja, Michael Krawczak, Gilles Gasparoni, Hella Hartmann, Andreas Dahl, Clemens Schafmayer, Jörn Walter, Jochen Hampe

Date Published: 1st Dec 2018

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract (Expand)

OBJECTIVES: Variants in patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 (PNPLA3; rs738409), transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2 (TM6SF2; rs58542926), and membrane bound O-acyltransferase domain containingg 7 (MBOAT7; rs641738) are risk factors for the development of alcohol-related cirrhosis. Within this population, PNPLA3 rs738409 is also an established risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this study was to explore possible risk associations of TM6SF2 rs58542926 and MBOAT7 rs641738 with HCC. METHODS: Risk variants in PNPLA3, TM6SF2, and MBOAT7 were genotyped in 751 cases with alcohol-related cirrhosis and HCC and in 1165 controls with alcohol-related cirrhosis without HCC. Association with the risk of developing HCC was analyzed using multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: The development of HCC was independently associated with PNPLA3 rs738409 (ORadjusted 1.84 [95% CI 1.55-2.18], p = 1.85 × 10-12) and TM6SF2 rs58542926 (ORadjusted 1.66 [1.30-2.13], p = 5.13 × 10-05), using an additive model, and controlling the sex, age, body mass index, and type 2 diabetes mellitus; the risk associated with carriage of MBOAT7 rs641738 (ORadjusted 1.04 [0.88-1.24], p = 0.61) was not significant. The population-attributable fractions were 43.5% for PNPLA3 rs738409, 11.5% for TM6SF2 rs58542926, and 49.9% for the carriage of both the variants combined. CONCLUSIONS: Carriage of TM6SF2 rs58542926 is an additional risk factor for the development of HCC in people with alcohol-related cirrhosis. Carriage of both PNPLA3 rs738409 and TM6SF2 rs58542926 accounts for half of the attributable risk for HCC in this population. Genotyping will allow for more precise HCC risk-stratification of patients with alcohol-related cirrhosis, and genotype-guided screening algorithms would optimize patient care.

Authors: Felix Stickel, Stephan Buch, Hans Dieter Nischalke, Karl Heinz Weiss, Daniel Gotthardt, Janett Fischer, Jonas Rosendahl, Astrid Marot, Mona Elamly, Markus Casper, Frank Lammert, Andrew McQuillin, Steffen Zopf, Ulrich Spengler, Silke Marhenke, Martha M. Kirstein, Arndt Vogel, Florian Eyer, Johann von Felden, Henning Wege, Thorsten Buch, Clemens Schafmayer, Felix Braun, Pierre Deltenre, Thomas Berg, Marsha Y. Morgan, Jochen Hampe

Date Published: 1st Oct 2018

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract (Expand)

OBJECTIVE: Homozygous alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency increases the risk for developing cirrhosis, whereas the relevance of heterozygous carriage remains unclear. Hence, we evaluated the impact of the two most relevant AAT variants ('Pi*Z' and 'Pi*S'), present in up to 10% of Caucasians, on subjects with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or alcohol misuse. DESIGN: We analysed multicentric case-control cohorts consisting of 1184 people with biopsy-proven NAFLD and of 2462 people with chronic alcohol misuse, both cohorts comprising cases with cirrhosis and controls without cirrhosis. Genotyping for the Pi*Z and Pi*S variants was performed. RESULTS: The Pi*Z variant presented in 13.8% of patients with cirrhotic NAFLD but only in 2.4% of counterparts without liver fibrosis (p<0.0001). Accordingly, the Pi*Z variant increased the risk of NAFLD subjects to develop cirrhosis (adjusted OR=7.3 (95% CI 2.2 to 24.8)). Likewise, the Pi*Z variant presented in 6.2% of alcohol misusers with cirrhosis but only in 2.2% of alcohol misusers without significant liver injury (p<0.0001). Correspondingly, alcohol misusers carrying the Pi*Z variant were prone to develop cirrhosis (adjusted OR=5.8 (95% CI 2.9 to 11.7)). In contrast, the Pi*S variant was not associated with NAFLD-related cirrhosis and only borderline with alcohol-related cirrhosis (adjusted OR=1.47 (95% CI 0.99 to 2.19)). CONCLUSION: The Pi*Z variant is the hitherto strongest single nucleotide polymorphism-based risk factor for cirrhosis in NAFLD and alcohol misuse, whereas the Pi*S variant confers only a weak risk in alcohol misusers. As 2%-4% of Caucasians are Pi*Z carriers, this finding should be considered in genetic counselling of affected individuals.

Authors: P. Strnad, S. Buch, K. Hamesch, J. Fischer, J. Rosendahl, R. Schmelz, S. Brueckner, M. Brosch, C. V. Heimes, V. Woditsch, D. Scholten, H. D. Nischalke, S. Janciauskiene, M. Mandorfer, M. Trauner, M. J. Way, A. McQuillin, M. C. Reichert, M. Krawczyk, M. Casper, F. Lammert, F. Braun, W. von Schonfels, S. Hinz, G. Burmeister, C. Hellerbrand, A. Teufel, A. Feldman, J. M. Schattenberg, H. Bantel, A. Pathil, M. Demir, J. Kluwe, T. Boettler, M. Ridinger, N. Wodarz, M. Soyka, M. Rietschel, F. Kiefer, T. Weber, S. Marhenke, A. Vogel, H. Hinrichsen, A. Canbay, M. Schlattjan, K. Sosnowsky, C. Sarrazin, J. von Felden, A. Geier, P. Deltenre, B. Sipos, C. Schafmayer, M. Nothnagel, E. Aigner, C. Datz, F. Stickel, M. Y. Morgan, J. Hampe, T. Berg, C. Trautwein

Date Published: 3rd Aug 2018

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract (Expand)

BACKGROUND: Liver transplantation (LTx) is a potentially curative treatment option for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in cirrhosis. However, patients, where HCC is already a systemic disease, LTx may be individually harmful and has a negative impact on donor organ usage. Thus, there is a need for improved selection criteria beyond nodule morphology to select patients with a favorable outcome for LTx in multifocal HCC. Evolutionary distance measured from genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism data between tumor nodules and the cirrhotic liver may be a prognostic marker of survival after LTx for multifocal HCC. METHODS: In a retrospective multicenter study, clinical data and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens of the liver and 2 tumor nodules were obtained from explants of 30 patients in the discovery and 180 patients in the replication cohort. DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens followed by genome wide single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping. RESULTS: Genotype quality criteria allowed for analysis of 8 patients in the discovery and 17 patients in the replication set. DNA concentrations of a total of 25 patients fulfilled the quality criteria and were included in the analysis. Both, in the discovery (P = 0.04) and in the replication data sets (P = 0.01), evolutionary distance was associated with the risk of recurrence of HCC after transplantation (combined P = 0.0002). In a univariate analysis, evolutionary distance (P = 7.4 x 10) and microvascular invasion (P = 1.31 x 10) were significantly associated with survival in a Cox regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Evolutionary distance allows for the determination of a high-risk group of recurrence if preoperative liver biopsy is considered.

Authors: N. Heits, M. Brosch, A. Herrmann, R. Behrens, C. Rocken, H. Schrem, A. Kaltenborn, J. Klempnauer, H. H. Kreipe, B. Reichert, C. Lenschow, C. Wilms, T. Vogel, H. Wolters, E. Wardelmann, D. Seehofer, S. Buch, S. Zeissig, S. Pannach, N. Raschzok, M. Dietel, W. von Schoenfels, S. Hinz, A. Teufel, M. Evert, A. Franke, T. Becker, F. Braun, J. Hampe, C. Schafmayer

Date Published: 12th Jul 2018

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract

Not specified

Authors: Markus Krauss, Ute Hofmann, Clemens Schafmayer, Svitlana Igel, Jan Schlender, Christian Mueller, Mario Brosch, Witigo von Schoenfels, Wiebke Erhart, Andreas Schuppert, Michael Block, Elke Schaeffeler, Gabriele Boehmer, Linus Goerlitz, Jan Hoecker, Joerg Lippert, Reinhold Kerb, Jochen Hampe, Lars Kuepfer, Matthias Schwab

Date Published: 1st Dec 2017

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract (Expand)

Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis, liver cancer, and related mortality. The endocannabinoid system contributes to the development of chronic liver diseases, where cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) has been shown to have a protecting role. Thus, here, we investigated how CB2 agonism by 4'-O-methylhonokiol (MHK), a biphenyl from Magnolia grandiflora, affects chronic alcohol-induced liver fibrosis and damage in mice. A combination of alcohol (10% vol/vol) and CCl4 (1 ml/kg) was applied to C57BL/6 mice for 5 weeks. MHK (5 mg/kg) was administered daily, and liver damage assessed by serum AST and ALT levels, histology, gene, and protein expression. Endocannabinoids (ECs) and related lipid derivatives were measured by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (LC-MS) in liver tissues. In vitro, MHK was studied in TGFbeta1-activated hepatic stellate cells (HSC). MHK treatment alleviated hepatic fibrosis, paralleled by induced expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2, -3, -9, and -13, and downregulation of CB1 mRNA. Necrotic lesions and hepatic inflammation were moderately improved, while IL-10 mRNA increased and IFNgamma, Mcl-1, JNK1, and RIPK1 normalized by MHK. Hepatic anandamide (AEA) and related N-acetylethanolamines (NAEs) were elevated in MHK group, whereas fatty acid synthase and diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 2 expression reduced. In vitro, MHK prevented HSC activation and induced apoptosis via induction of bak1 and bcl-2. To conclude, MHK revealed hepatoprotective effects during alcohol-induced liver damage through the induction of MMPs, AEA, and NAEs and prevention of HSC activation, indicating MHK as a potent therapeutic for liver fibrosis and ALD. KEY MESSAGES: Methylhonokiol improves liver damage and survival. Methylhonokiol reduces hepatic fibrosis and necroinflammation. Methylhonokiol prevents myofibroblast activation and induces apoptosis. Methylhonokiol upregulates endocannabinoids and related N-acylethanolamines. Methylhonokiol contributes to lipid hydrolysis via PPARalpha/gamma.

Authors: E. Patsenker, A. Chicca, V. Petrucci, S. Moghadamrad, A. de Gottardi, J. Hampe, J. Gertsch, N. Semmo, F. Stickel

Date Published: 8th Jul 2017

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract

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Authors: S. Stengel, A. Stallmach, K. Richter, A. Landrock, J. Hampe, T. Bruns

Date Published: 6th Jul 2017

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract (Expand)

Early indication of late-stage failure of novel candidate drugs could be facilitated by continuous integration, assessment, and transfer of knowledge acquired along pharmaceutical development programs. We here present a translational systems pharmacology workflow that combines drug cocktail probing in a specifically designed clinical study, physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling, and Bayesian statistics to identify and transfer (patho-)physiological and drug-specific knowledge across distinct patient populations. Our work builds on two clinical investigations, one with 103 healthy volunteers and one with 79 diseased patients from which we systematically derived physiological information from pharmacokinetic data for a reference probe drug (midazolam) at the single-patient level. Taking into account the acquired knowledge describing (patho-)physiological alterations in the patient cohort allowed the successful prediction of the population pharmacokinetics of a second, candidate probe drug (torsemide) in the patient population. In addition, we identified significant relations of the acquired physiological processes to patient metadata from liver biopsies. The presented prototypical systems pharmacology approach is a proof of concept for model-based translation across different stages of pharmaceutical development programs. Applied consistently, it has the potential to systematically improve predictivity of pharmacokinetic simulations by incorporating the results of clinical trials and translating them to subsequent studies.

Authors: M. Krauss, U. Hofmann, C. Schafmayer, S. Igel, J. Schlender, C. Mueller, M. Brosch, W. von Schoenfels, W. Erhart, A. Schuppert, M. Block, E. Schaeffeler, G. Boehmer, L. Goerlitz, J. Hoecker, J. Lippert, R. Kerb, J. Hampe, L. Kuepfer, M. Schwab

Date Published: 27th Jun 2017

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract (Expand)

Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a leading cause of cirrhosis, liver cancer, and acute and chronic liver failure and as such causes significant morbidity and mortality. While alcohol consumption is slightly decreasing in several European countries, it is rising in others and remains high in many countries around the world. The pathophysiology of ALD is still incompletely understood but relates largely to the direct toxic effects of alcohol and its main intermediate, acetaldehyde. Recently, novel putative mechanisms have been identified in systematic scans covering the entire human genome and raise new hypotheses on previously unknown pathways. The latter also identify host genetic risk factors for significant liver injury, which may help design prognostic risk scores. The diagnosis of ALD is relatively easy with a panel of well-evaluated tests and only rarely requires a liver biopsy. Treatment of ALD is difficult and grounded in abstinence as the pivotal therapeutic goal; once cirrhosis is established, treatment largely resembles that of other etiologies of advanced liver damage. Liver transplantation is a sound option for carefully selected patients with cirrhosis and alcoholic hepatitis because relapse rates are low and prognosis is comparable to other etiologies. Still, many countries are restrictive in allocating donor livers for ALD patients. Overall, few therapeutic options exist for severe ALD. However, there is good evidence of benefit for only corticosteroids in severe alcoholic hepatitis, while most other efforts are of limited efficacy. Considering the immense burden of ALD worldwide, efforts of medical professionals and industry partners to develop targeted therapies in ALF has been disappointingly low.

Authors: F. Stickel, C. Datz, J. Hampe, R. Bataller

Date Published: 15th Mar 2017

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract (Expand)

Approximately 1.5 billion people worldwide are overweight or affected by obesity, and are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and related metabolic and inflammatory disturbances. Although the mechanisms linking adiposity to associated clinical conditions are poorly understood, recent studies suggest that adiposity may influence DNA methylation, a key regulator of gene expression and molecular phenotype. Here we use epigenome-wide association to show that body mass index (BMI; a key measure of adiposity) is associated with widespread changes in DNA methylation (187 genetic loci with P < 1 x 10(-7), range P = 9.2 x 10(-8) to 6.0 x 10(-46); n = 10,261 samples). Genetic association analyses demonstrate that the alterations in DNA methylation are predominantly the consequence of adiposity, rather than the cause. We find that methylation loci are enriched for functional genomic features in multiple tissues (P < 0.05), and show that sentinel methylation markers identify gene expression signatures at 38 loci (P < 9.0 x 10(-6), range P = 5.5 x 10(-6) to 6.1 x 10(-35), n = 1,785 samples). The methylation loci identify genes involved in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism, substrate transport and inflammatory pathways. Finally, we show that the disturbances in DNA methylation predict future development of type 2 diabetes (relative risk per 1 standard deviation increase in methylation risk score: 2.3 (2.07-2.56); P = 1.1 x 10(-54)). Our results provide new insights into the biologic pathways influenced by adiposity, and may enable development of new strategies for prediction and prevention of type 2 diabetes and other adverse clinical consequences of obesity.

Authors: S. Wahl, A. Drong, B. Lehne, M. Loh, W. R. Scott, S. Kunze, P. C. Tsai, J. S. Ried, W. Zhang, Y. Yang, S. Tan, G. Fiorito, L. Franke, S. Guarrera, S. Kasela, J. Kriebel, R. C. Richmond, M. Adamo, U. Afzal, M. Ala-Korpela, B. Albetti, O. Ammerpohl, J. F. Apperley, M. Beekman, P. A. Bertazzi, S. L. Black, C. Blancher, M. J. Bonder, M. Brosch, M. Carstensen-Kirberg, A. J. de Craen, S. de Lusignan, A. Dehghan, M. Elkalaawy, K. Fischer, O. H. Franco, T. R. Gaunt, J. Hampe, M. Hashemi, A. Isaacs, A. Jenkinson, S. Jha, N. Kato, V. Krogh, M. Laffan, C. Meisinger, T. Meitinger, Z. Y. Mok, V. Motta, H. K. Ng, Z. Nikolakopoulou, G. Nteliopoulos, S. Panico, N. Pervjakova, H. Prokisch, W. Rathmann, M. Roden, F. Rota, M. A. Rozario, J. K. Sandling, C. Schafmayer, K. Schramm, R. Siebert, P. E. Slagboom, P. Soininen, L. Stolk, K. Strauch, E. S. Tai, L. Tarantini, B. Thorand, E. F. Tigchelaar, R. Tumino, A. G. Uitterlinden, C. van Duijn, J. B. van Meurs, P. Vineis, A. R. Wickremasinghe, C. Wijmenga, T. P. Yang, W. Yuan, A. Zhernakova, R. L. Batterham, G. D. Smith, P. Deloukas, B. T. Heijmans, C. Herder, A. Hofman, C. M. Lindgren, L. Milani, P. van der Harst, A. Peters, T. Illig, C. L. Relton, M. Waldenberger, M. R. Jarvelin, V. Bollati, R. Soong, T. D. Spector, J. Scott, M. I. McCarthy, P. Elliott, J. T. Bell, G. Matullo, C. Gieger, J. S. Kooner, H. Grallert, J. C. Chambers

Date Published: 21st Dec 2016

Publication Type: Not specified

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