Publications

17 Publications visible to you, out of a total of 17

Abstract (Expand)

COVID-19 poses a major challenge to individuals and societies around the world. Yet, it is difficult to obtain a good overview of studies across different medical fields of research such as clinical trials, epidemiology, and public health. Here, we describe a consensus metadata model to facilitate structured searches of COVID-19 studies and resources along with its implementation in three linked complementary web-based platforms. A relational database serves as central study metadata hub that secures compatibilities with common trials registries (e.g. ICTRP and standards like HL7 FHIR, CDISC ODM, and DataCite). The Central Search Hub was developed as a single-page application, the other two components with additional frontends are based on the SEEK platform and MICA, respectively. These platforms have different features concerning cohort browsing, item browsing, and access to documents and other study resources to meet divergent user needs. By this we want to promote transparent and harmonized COVID-19 research.

Authors: C. O. Schmidt, J. Darms, A. Shutsko, M. Lobe, R. Nagrani, B. Seifert, B. Lindstadt, M. Golebiewski, S. Koleva, T. Bender, C. R. Bauer, U. Sax, X. Hu, M. Lieser, V. Junker, S. Klopfenstein, A. Zeleke, D. Waltemath, I. Pigeot, J. Fluck

Date Published: 27th May 2021

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract (Expand)

We describe a large-scale community effort to build an open-access, interoperable, and computable repository of COVID-19 molecular mechanisms - the COVID-19 Disease Map. We discuss the tools, platforms, and guidelines necessary for the distributed development of its contents by a multi-faceted community of biocurators, domain experts, bioinformaticians, and computational biologists. We highlight the role of relevant databases and text mining approaches in enrichment and validation of the curated mechanisms. We describe the contents of the Map and their relevance to the molecular pathophysiology of COVID-19 and the analytical and computational modelling approaches that can be applied for mechanistic data interpretation and predictions. We conclude by demonstrating concrete applications of our work through several use cases and highlight new testable hypotheses.

Authors: Marek Ostaszewski, Anna Niarakis, Alexander Mazein, Inna Kuperstein, Robert Phair, Aurelio Orta-Resendiz, Vidisha Singh, Sara Sadat Aghamiri, Marcio Luis Acencio, Enrico Glaab, Andreas Ruepp, Gisela Fobo, Corinna Montrone, Barbara Brauner, Goar Frishman, Luis Cristóbal Monraz Gómez, Julia Somers, Matti Hoch, Shailendra Kumar Gupta, Julia Scheel, Hanna Borlinghaus, Tobias Czauderna, Falk Schreiber, Arnau Montagud, Miguel Ponce de Leon, Akira Funahashi, Yusuke Hiki, Noriko Hiroi, Takahiro G. Yamada, Andreas Dräger, Alina Renz, Muhammad Naveez, Zsolt Bocskei, Francesco Messina, Daniela Börnigen, Liam Fergusson, Marta Conti, Marius Rameil, Vanessa Nakonecnij, Jakob Vanhoefer, Leonard Schmiester, Muying Wang, Emily E. Ackerman, Jason Shoemaker, Jeremy Zucker, Kristie Oxford, Jeremy Teuton, Ebru Kocakaya, Gökçe Yağmur Summak, Kristina Hanspers, Martina Kutmon, Susan Coort, Lars Eijssen, Friederike Ehrhart, D. A. B. Rex, Denise Slenter, Marvin Martens, Nhung Pham, Robin Haw, Bijay Jassal, Lisa Matthews, Marija Orlic-Milacic, Andrea Senff Ribeiro, Karen Rothfels, Veronica Shamovsky, Ralf Stephan, Cristoffer Sevilla, Thawfeek Varusai, Jean-Marie Ravel, Rupsha Fraser, Vera Ortseifen, Silvia Marchesi, Piotr Gawron, Ewa Smula, Laurent Heirendt, Venkata Satagopam, Guanming Wu, Anders Riutta, Martin Golebiewski, Stuart Owen, Carole Goble, Xiaoming Hu, Rupert W. Overall, Dieter Maier, Angela Bauch, Benjamin M. Gyori, John A. Bachman, Carlos Vega, Valentin Grouès, Miguel Vazquez, Pablo Porras, Luana Licata, Marta Iannuccelli, Francesca Sacco, Anastasia Nesterova, Anton Yuryev, Anita de Waard, Denes Turei, Augustin Luna, Ozgun Babur, Sylvain Soliman, Alberto Valdeolivas, Marina Esteban- Medina, Maria Peña-Chilet, Kinza Rian, Tomáš Helikar, Bhanwar Lal Puniya, Dezso Modos, Agatha Treveil, Marton Olbei, Bertrand De Meulder, Aurélien Dugourd, Aurélien Naldi, Vincent Noë, Laurence Calzone, Chris Sander, Emek Demir, Tamas Korcsmaros, Tom C. Freeman, Franck Augé, Jacques S. Beckmann, Jan Hasenauer, Olaf Wolkenhauer, Egon L. Wilighagen, Alexander R. Pico, Chris T. Evelo, Marc E. Gillespie, Lincoln D. Stein, Henning Hermjakob, Peter D’Eustachio, Julio Saez-Rodriguez, Joaquin Dopazo, Alfonso Valencia, Hiroaki Kitano, Emmanuel Barillot, Charles Auffray, Rudi Balling, Reinhard Schneider

Date Published: 28th Oct 2020

Publication Type: Misc

Abstract (Expand)

Despite the ever-progressing technological advances in producing data in health and clinical research, the generation of new knowledge for medical benefits through advanced analytics still lags behind its full potential. Reasons for this obstacle are the inherent heterogeneity of data sources and the lack of broadly accepted standards. Further hurdles are associated with legal and ethical issues surrounding the use of personal/patient data across disciplines and borders. Consequently, there is a need for broadly applicable standards compliant with legal and ethical regulations that allow interpretation of heterogeneous health data through in silico methodologies to advance personalized medicine. To tackle these standardization challenges, the Horizon2020 Coordinating and Support Action EU-STANDS4PM initiated an EU-wide mapping process to evaluate strategies for data integration and data-driven in silico modelling approaches to develop standards, recommendations and guidelines for personalized medicine. A first step towards this goal is a broad stakeholder consultation process initiated by an EU-STANDS4PM workshop at the annual COMBINE meeting (COMBINE 2019 workshop report in same issue). This forum analysed the status quo of data and model standards and reflected on possibilities as well as challenges for cross-domain data integration to facilitate in silico modelling approaches for personalized medicine.

Authors: S. Brunak, C. Bjerre Collin, K. Eva O Cathaoir, M. Golebiewski, M. Kirschner, I. Kockum, H. Moser, D. Waltemath

Date Published: 24th Jul 2020

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract (Expand)

This paper presents a report on outcomes of the 10th Computational Modeling in Biology Network (COMBINE) meeting that was held in Heidelberg, Germany, in July of 2019. The annual event brings together researchers, biocurators and software engineers to present recent results and discuss future work in the area of standards for systems and synthetic biology. The COMBINE initiative coordinates the development of various community standards and formats for computational models in the life sciences. Over the past 10 years, COMBINE has brought together standard communities that have further developed and harmonized their standards for better interoperability of models and data. COMBINE 2019 was co-located with a stakeholder workshop of the European EU-STANDS4PM initiative that aims at harmonized data and model standardization for in silico models in the field of personalized medicine, as well as with the FAIRDOM PALs meeting to discuss findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable (FAIR) data sharing. This report briefly describes the work discussed in invited and contributed talks as well as during breakout sessions. It also highlights recent advancements in data, model, and annotation standardization efforts. Finally, this report concludes with some challenges and opportunities that this community will face during the next 10 years.

Authors: Dagmar Waltemath, Martin Golebiewski, Michael L Blinov, Padraig Gleeson, Henning Hermjakob, Michael Hucka, Esther Thea Inau, Sarah M Keating, Matthias König, Olga Krebs, Rahuman S Malik-Sheriff, David Nickerson, Ernst Oberortner, Herbert M Sauro, Falk Schreiber, Lucian Smith, Melanie I Stefan, Ulrike Wittig, Chris J Myers

Date Published: 29th Jun 2020

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract (Expand)

This special issue of the Journal of Integrative Bioinformatics presents papers related to the 10th COMBINE meeting together with the annual update of COMBINE standards in systems and synthetic biology.Not specified

Authors: Falk Schreiber, Björn Sommer, Tobias Czauderna, Martin Golebiewski, Thomas E. Gorochowski, Michael Hucka, Sarah M. Keating, Matthias König, Chris Myers, David Nickerson, Dagmar Waltemath

Date Published: 29th Jun 2020

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract (Expand)

A standardized approach to annotating computational biomedical models and their associated files can facilitate model reuse and reproducibility among research groups, enhance search and retrieval of models and data, and enable semantic comparisons between models. Motivated by these potential benefits and guided by consensus across the COmputational Modeling in BIology NEtwork (COMBINE) community, we have developed a specification for encoding annotations in Open Modeling and EXchange (OMEX)-formatted archives. Distributing modeling projects within these archives is a best practice established by COMBINE, and the OMEX metadata specification presented here provides a harmonized, community-driven approach for annotating a variety of standardized model and data representation formats within an archive. The specification primarily includes technical guidelines for encoding archive metadata, so that software tools can more easily utilize and exchange it, thereby spurring broad advancements in model reuse, discovery, and semantic analyses.

Authors: Maxwell L. Neal, John H. Gennari, Dagmar Waltemath, David P. Nickerson, Matthias König

Date Published: 25th Jun 2020

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract (Expand)

Computational systems biology involves integrating heterogeneous datasets in order to generate models. These models can assist with understanding and prediction of biological phenomena. Generating datasets and integrating them into models involves a wide range of scientific expertise. As a result these datasets are often collected by one set of researchers, and exchanged with others researchers for constructing the models. For this process to run smoothly the data and models must be FAIR-findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable. In order for data and models to be FAIR they must be structured in consistent and predictable ways, and described sufficiently for other researchers to understand them. Furthermore, these data and models must be shared with other researchers, with appropriately controlled sharing permissions, before and after publication. In this chapter we explore the different data and model standards that assist with structuring, describing, and sharing. We also highlight the popular standards and sharing databases within computational systems biology.

Authors: N. J. Stanford, M. Scharm, P. D. Dobson, M. Golebiewski, M. Hucka, V. B. Kothamachu, D. Nickerson, S. Owen, J. Pahle, U. Wittig, D. Waltemath, C. Goble, P. Mendes, J. Snoep

Date Published: 12th Oct 2019

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract (Expand)

This special issue of the Journal of Integrative Bioinformatics presents an overview of COMBINE standards and their latest specifications. The standards cover representation formats for computational modeling in synthetic and systems biology and include BioPAX, CellML, NeuroML, SBML, SBGN, SBOL and SED-ML. The articles in this issue contain updated specifications of SBGN Process Description Level 1 Version 2, SBML Level 3 Core Version 2 Release 2, SBOL Version 2.3.0, and SBOL Visual Version 2.1.

Authors: Falk Schreiber, Björn Sommer, Gary D. Bader, Padraig Gleeson, Martin Golebiewski, Michael Hucka, Sarah M. Keating, Matthias König, Chris Myers, David Nickerson, Dagmar Waltemath

Date Published: 26th Jun 2019

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract (Expand)

Data standards support the reliable exchange of information, the interoperability of tools, and the reproducibility of scientific results. In systems biology standards are agreed ways of structuring, describing, and associating models and data, as well as their respective parts, graphical visualization, and information about applied experimental or computational methods. Such standards also assist with describing how constituent parts interact together, or are linked, and how they are embedded in their environmental and experimental context. Here the focus will be on standards for formatting models and their content, and on metadata checklists and ontologies that support modeling.

Author: Martin Golebiewski

Date Published: 2019

Publication Type: InBook

Abstract

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.4056/sigs.5279417.].

Authors: D. Waltemath, F. T. Bergmann, C. Chaouiya, T. Czauderna, P. Gleeson, C. Goble, M. Golebiewski, M. Hucka, N. Juty, O. Krebs, N. Le Novere, H. Mi, I. I. Moraru, C. J. Myers, D. Nickerson, B. G. Olivier, N. Rodriguez, F. Schreiber, L. Smith, F. Zhang, E. Bonnet

Date Published: 9th Aug 2018

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract (Expand)

Standards are essential to the advancement of Systems and Synthetic Biology. COMBINE provides a formal body and a centralised platform to help develop and disseminate relevant standards and related resources. The regular special issue of the Journal of Integrative Bioinformatics aims to support the exchange, distribution and archiving of these standards by providing unified, easily citable access. This paper provides an overview of existing COMBINE standards and presents developments of the last year.

Authors: F. Schreiber, G. D. Bader, P. Gleeson, M. Golebiewski, M. Hucka, S. M. Keating, N. L. Novere, C. Myers, D. Nickerson, B. Sommer, D. Waltemath

Date Published: 30th Mar 2018

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract (Expand)

Life science researchers use computational models to articulate and test hypotheses about the behavior of biological systems. Semantic annotation is a critical component for enhancing the interoperability and reusability of such models as well as for the integration of the data needed for model parameterization and validation. Encoded as machine-readable links to knowledge resource terms, semantic annotations describe the computational or biological meaning of what models and data represent. These annotations help researchers find and repurpose models, accelerate model composition and enable knowledge integration across model repositories and experimental data stores. However, realizing the potential benefits of semantic annotation requires the development of model annotation standards that adhere to a community-based annotation protocol. Without such standards, tool developers must account for a variety of annotation formats and approaches, a situation that can become prohibitively cumbersome and which can defeat the purpose of linking model elements to controlled knowledge resource terms. Currently, no consensus protocol for semantic annotation exists among the larger biological modeling community. Here, we report on the landscape of current annotation practices among the COmputational Modeling in BIology NEtwork community and provide a set of recommendations for building a consensus approach to semantic annotation.

Authors: M. L. Neal, M. Konig, D. Nickerson, G. Misirli, R. Kalbasi, A. Drager, K. Atalag, V. Chelliah, M. T. Cooling, D. L. Cook, S. Crook, M. de Alba, S. H. Friedman, A. Garny, J. H. Gennari, P. Gleeson, M. Golebiewski, M. Hucka, N. Juty, C. Myers, B. G. Olivier, H. M. Sauro, M. Scharm, J. L. Snoep, V. Toure, A. Wipat, O. Wolkenhauer, D. Waltemath

Date Published: 22nd Jan 2018

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract (Expand)

Standards for data exchange are critical to the development of any field. They enable researchers and practitioners to transport information reliably, to apply a variety of tools to their problems, and to reproduce scientific results. Over the past two decades, a range of standards have been developed to facilitate the exchange and reuse of information in the domain of representation and modeling of biological systems. These standards are complementary, so the interactions between their developers increased over time. By the end of the last decade, the community of researchers decided that more interoperability is required between the standards, and that common development is needed to make better use of effort, time, and money devoted to this activity. The COmputational MOdeling in Biology NEtwork (COMBINE) was created to enable the sharing of resources, tools, and other infrastructure. This paper provides a brief history of this endeavor and the challenges that remain.

Authors: Chris J. Myers, Gary Bader, Padraig Gleeson, Martin Golebiewski, Michael Hucka, Nicolas Le Novere, David P. Nickerson, Falk Schreiber, Dagmar Waltemath

Date Published: 1st Dec 2017

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract

Not specified

Authors: Wolfgang Müller, Meik Bittkowski, Martin Golebiewski, Renate Kania, Maja Rey, Andreas Weidemann, Ulrike Wittig

Date Published: 1st Mar 2017

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract (Expand)

Standards are essential to the advancement of science and technology. In systems and synthetic biology, numerous standards and associated tools have been developed over the last 16 years. This special issue of the Journal of Integrative Bioinformatics aims to support the exchange, distribution and archiving of these standards, as well as to provide centralised and easily citable access to them.

Authors: F. Schreiber, G. D. Bader, P. Gleeson, M. Golebiewski, M. Hucka, N. Le Novere, C. Myers, D. Nickerson, B. Sommer, D. Walthemath

Date Published: 12th Feb 2017

Publication Type: Not specified

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